A Case Report of Conversion Catatonia

Published

2022-10-31

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.55229/ijbs.v25i2.12

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Authors

  • Shailja Singh Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical college and hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Nayab Anjum Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical college and hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Zeba Khan Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical college and hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • M. Reyazuddin Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical college and hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Abstract

Catatonia is characterized by marked psychomotor disturbance and was first described by Karl Ludwig Kaulbaum in 1874.1 Later, it was evaluated as a subtype of schizophrenia. After the 1960s, it was revealed that other conditions can also cause catatonia.2 Gelenberg (1976) said there could be more than 40 cases that could cause catatonia and many new ones have emerged since then.3 Previous data suggest that catatonia is more common in mood disorders than in schizophrenia. The other causes of catatonia can be due to medical causes like endocrine disorders, infections, electrolyte imbalance, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. An excessive dosage of drugs or substances like cocaine, ecstasy, disulfiram, and levetiracetam can also result in catatonia.4,5

How to Cite

Singh, S., Anjum, N., Khan, Z., & Reyazuddin, M. (2022). A Case Report of Conversion Catatonia. Indian Journal of Behavioural Sciences, 25(02), 152–154. https://doi.org/10.55229/ijbs.v25i2.12

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